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About the resources

This collection of lessons was originally published in two teaching resources, Recognizing an Historic Injustice: Canada’s First National Internment Operations, 1914-1920 and Developing Understanding Through the Arts. Developed in collaboration with the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund, the purpose of these lessons is to raise critical awareness among students about the largely unknown story of Canada’s first national internment operations, between 1914 and 1920. It was not until 2008 that the Canadian government recognized this legally sanctioned historical injustice. Part of the pledge to redress this wrong is to educate Canadian youth about the First World War internment era and, through greater awareness, ensure that similar injustices are less likely to be to be repeated.

In addition to highlighting the voices of the individuals and groups affected by the internment, these lessons feature the use of six historical thinking concepts originally developed by Professor Peter Seixas of the University of British Columbia. The use of the historical thinking concepts enables students to go beyond merely learning historical information to thinking deeply about Canada’s First National Internment Operations.


Recognizing an Historic Injustice: Canada's First National Internment Operation, 1914-1920
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Recognizing an Historic Injustice seeks to raise critical awareness among secondary school students about the largely unknown story of Canada’s first national internment operations. The publication is an attempt to recognize those who suffered from this injustice and, through greater awareness, ensure that similar injustices are less likely to be to be repeated.

Developing Understanding Through the Arts - Recognizing an Historic Injustice: Canada's First National Internment Operation, 1914-1920
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Developing Understanding through the Arts is a unit for students in grades 4 to 9 that explores the experiences of Ukrainian and other European immigrants to Canada in the late 1800s and early 1900s and the impacts of internment on individuals, families and communities. The lesson plans in this resource are self-contained, each focusing on developing understanding through the use of a related art form.



Contents

Why did it happen?
What were the camps like?
What were the impacts on individuals and communities?
How adequately did governments respond?
What should we all know about these events?

External linkSee all World War I Internment History Docs

Why did it happen?

Prisoner on a Stretcher

This collection of lessons and source documents uses the historical thinking concepts of cause and consequence and historical perspective to explore the causes of Canada’s first national internment operations.


Lessons

PDF documentWhy did European immigrants come to Canada? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat was daily life like for European immigrants to Canada? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat were the challenges, opportunities and achievements of Ukrainian immigrants? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhy did it happen? (Grades 7-12)


Cause and consequence Cause and consequence

This video considers who or what influenced history and what were the repercussions of these changes (6:20 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Cause and consequence (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Cause and consequence (Grades 9-12)


Historical perspective Historical perspective

This video discusses the viewing of the past through the social, intellectual, emotional and ethical lenses of the time (5:53 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Historical perspective (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Historical perspective (Grades 9-12)

Source documents

PDF documentReasons for WW I internment
PDF documentWW I internment justified

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What were the camps like?

Camp Otter

This collection of lessons and source documents uses the historical thinking concept of evidence and interpretation to examine the conditions of the internment camps.


Lessons

PDF documentWhat was life like in internment camps? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat were the camps like? (Grades 7-12)


Evidence and interpretation Evidence and interpretation

This video introduces the validation, interpretation and use of primary and secondary sources of historical information in the construction of historical accounts and arguments (6:55 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Evidence and interpretation (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Evidence and interpretation (Grades 9-12)

Source documents

PDF documentDaily life in WW I internment camps

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What were the impacts on individuals and communities?

Winnipeg Strike

This collection of lessons and source documents uses the historical thinking concept of continuity and change to examine the effects of the internment on internees and their communities.


Lessons

PDF documentWhat might the internees have felt and thought? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat might Ukrainian and other European immigrants have felt and thought? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhich are the most important story events? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentHow might creating sounds deepen our understanding of events and experiences? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentHow might creating dramatic poses deepen our understanding of events and experiences? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat was the impact of internment on individuals? (Grades 7-12)
PDF documentHow did internment change the communities? (Grades 7-12)


Continuity and change Continuity and change

This video explains how lives and conditions are alike over periods of time and how they changed for people and societies that came before and after (6:19 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Continuity and change (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Continuity and change (Grades 9-12)

Source documents

PDF documentEffects of WW I internment for Ukrainians
PDF documentUkrainian life after internment 1920-1946
PDF documentConditions for early Ukrainian immigrants

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How adequately did governments respond?

Print Shop

This lesson uses the historical thinking concept of ethical judgment to assess the adequacy of government responses to Canada’s first national internment operations.


Lessons

PDF documentHow adequately has the government responded? (Grades 7-12)


Ethical judgment Ethical judgment

This video explores assessing the past and the implications of past actions in light of past and present norms about the appropriate treatment of others (6:53 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Continuity and change (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Continuity and change (Grades 9-12)

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What should we all know about these events?

Kapuskasing

This collection of lessons uses the concept of historical significance to determine what about Canada’s first national internment operations should be remembered, researched, taught and learned.


Lessons

PDF documentWhat might the internees have felt and thought? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhat might Ukrainian and other European immigrants have felt and thought? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentWhich are the most important story events? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentHow might creating sounds deepen our understanding of events and experiences? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentHow might creating dramatic poses deepen our understanding of events and experiences? (Grades 4-9)
PDF documentShould this event be in the curriculum? (Grades 7-12)
PDF documentWhat should we all know? (Grades 7-12)
PDF documentCould it happen again? (Grades 7-12)
PDF documentHow can we educate others? (Grades 7-12)


Historical significance Historical significance

This video introduces students to the factors that determine what and who from the past should be remembered, researched, taught and learned (7:14 minutes)

PDF document Lesson plan: Historical significance (Grades 6-8)
PDF document Lesson plan: Historical significance (Grades 9-12)